South Carolina Department of Archives and History
National Register Properties in South Carolina

Gravel Hill Plantation, Hampton County (3954 Augusta Stage Coach Road, Hampton)
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Setting of
Live Oaks
Main House
view from
Southeast
Main House Main House
Porch Detail
Main House
Porch Window
Detail
S1081772501106 S1081772501107 S1081772501108 S1081772501109 S1081772501110
Main House
Porch
Main House
Breezeway
Main House
Kitchen Wing
Main House
Living Room
Main House
Living Room
Window
S1081772501111 S1081772501112 S1081772501113 S1081772501114 S1081772501115
Main House
Living Room
Ceiling
Main House
Living Room
Entry Door
Main House
Living Room
Ducth Door
Main House
Dining Room
Main House
Dining Room
Mantel
S1081772501116 S1081772501117 S1081772501118 S1081772501119 S1081772501120
Main House
Dining Room
Mantel Detail
Main House
Bedroom
Main House
Bedroom
Main House
Bedroom
Mantel
Main House
Bedroom
Dormer
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Guest House Guest House
End View
Ice House (L)
and Laundry (R)
Manager's House Manager's House
End View

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Gravel Hill Plantation is architecturally significant as a rare and fully-realized example in South Carolina of the Adirondack or Rustic Style and the only known extant design south of the state of New York by architect Robert Palmer Huntington. The plantation is also historically significant as an example of the hunting plantation phenomenon in the South Carolina lowcountry from the end of the Civil War to World War II, in which wealthy Northerners acquired, and in many cases consolidated, historic plantations to create large recreational preserves and seasonal residences. Gravel Hill Plantation is the twenty-acre core of a large hunting plantation that includes eleven historic buildings, nine of them designed and built ca. 1910 by the owner, Robert Palmer Huntington. The complex includes three residential buildings, a kitchen and dining facility, ice house, stables and ancillary service buildings. Two additional historic buildings, a corncrib and a tenantís house, are vernacular in construction and presumably date from the months in 1909-10 when this complex was being planned and built by Huntington. Listed in the National Register May 10, 2010.

View the complete text of the nomination form for this National Register property.

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