South Carolina Department of Archives and History
National Register Properties in South Carolina

Earle R. Taylor House and Peach Packing Shed, Greenville County (1001 Locust Hill Rd., Greer vicinity)
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Main House
Facade
Main House
Main Entrance
Main House
Left Oblique
Main House
Rear Elevation
Main House
Interior
Stairway
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Garage Peach Packing Shed
Facade
Peach Packing Shed
Left Oblique
Peach Packing Shed
Right Elevation
Aerial View

The Earle R. Taylor House and Peach Packing Shed are significant for their association with the early development of peach growing in Greer, South Carolina, and for their architecture which includes an excellent example of the work of local architect Thomas Keating and a rare example of an intact upstate peach packing shed. The Taylor family was one of the first in the area to plant and grow peaches. By 1898, Earle Taylorís father, James Pashcal Taylor had moved to Greer and was the first man to plant 500 peach trees in the area. Earle Taylor started his peach operation in 1917 and was shipping peaches to northern markets in 1920 by rail. At its peak, the 900 acre farm had 30,000 peach and apple trees on 300 acres, cotton fields and about 100 head of Angus cattle. The two-story brick house is significant as an example of a Colonial Revival house built in 1939 and designed by Keating. The main house sits on a small hill with a rolling pasture to the east. To the rear of the house is a contributing frame garage (1949). A busy highway separates the house from the ca. 1925 peach packing shed and a ca. 1935 office. The packing shed sits on a triangular parcel of land with a small asphalt parking lot. It is an open wood-framed two story gable-front building with one story shed-roofed wings on each side, wood siding, a metal roof, and a block foundation. Once the peaches were picked in the fields and loaded into bins they were then transported to the packing shed for processing. Listed in the National Register June 27, 2012.

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