South Carolina Department of Archives and History
National Register Properties in South Carolina

Horn Creek Baptist Church, Edgefield County (off S.C. Sec. Rd. 133, Edgefield vicinity)
S1081771900701 S1081771900702 S1081771900703 S1081771900704
Facade Right Oblique Fieldstone
Foundation Piers

One of the oldest Baptist churches in the South Carolina Upcountry, Horn Creek was incorporated in 1790. Today it is one of the few remaining meeting house style churches in the area reflecting austere simplicity and manifesting frugality of early settlers. The one-roomed church is supported by fieldstone foundation piers and has wooden steps leading to two front doors that are hinged to fold in the center. A door behind the pulpit leads to a creek for baptizing. The church’s adjoining cemetery has excellent iron work including a cast iron gate at the Bettis plot which has a design that incorporates a Palmetto tree flanked by lambs and roses. A wooden fence next to the Bettis plot surrounds fieldstone markers. Revolutionary War activity in the Horn Creek area included a 1781 skirmish in which patriot Captain Thomas Kee of Colonel Leroy Hammond’s regiment, attacked a Tory party under Captain Clark. Clark was killed and the entire company was made prisoners. Listed in the National Register May 6, 1971.

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