South Carolina Department of Archives and History
National Register Properties in South Carolina

Colvin-Fant-Durham Farm Complex, Chester County
(S.C. Hwy. 522 near jct. with S.C. Hwy. 16, Chester vicinity)
S1081771201501 S1081771201502 S1081771201503 S1081771201504 S1081771201505
Facade Right Oblique Left Elevation Facade Kitchen/
Dining Room Ell
Main Entrance
Detail
S1081771201506 S1081771201507 S1081771201508 S1081771201509 S1081771201510
Interior
Hall Mantel
Interior
Staircase
Outbuilding
Well/Power House
Outbuilding
Cotton Seed House
Outbuilding
Smokehouse

(Nicholas Colvin House; Durham House) Composed of one of Chester County’s most intact vernacular farmhouses with transitional Federal and early Greek Revival detailing, as well as a variety of outbuildings, the Colvin-Fant-Durham Farm Complex is an outstanding example of a nineteenth and early twentieth century farmstead. The period of significance, ca. 1835 to ca. 1940, represents the continued operation of this farm by Nicholas Colvin, Jr., and his direct descendants, and is embodied by the residence and extant outbuildings. The ca. 1835 vernacular hall and parlor plan farmhouse with its transitional Federal and early Greek Revival detailing is a remarkably well-crafted example of vernacular domestic architecture from the period. The house consists of a two-story, frame main block and a one-story, frame dining room and kitchen ell, which was added in the late nineteenth century. The main block is two rooms deep and three bays wide, with a composition shingle (over original wood shingles), lateral gable roof that breaks over the rear first and second story rooms in a shallow pitched, catslide configuration. A one-story engaged shed-roofed porch on the fašade shelters two doorways. The house rests on a stone-pier foundation. The property also includes a smokehouse, well house/power house, mule barn, tenant house, and a log cottonseed house. Listed in the National Register July 30, 1992.

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