South Carolina Department of Archives and History
National Register Properties in South Carolina

Warrenville Elementary School, Aiken County (115 Timmerman St., Warrenville)
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Facade Right Oblique Right Elevation Cafeteria Wing Rear Elevation
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Left Elevation Main Entrance Interior
Double Stair
Interior
Hallway
Interior
Auditorium
Stage
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Interior
Auditorium
Seating
Interior
Auditorium
Balcony

Warrenville Elementary School, originally known as Warrenville Graded School, is an excellent example of the Classical Revival style of school architecture that flourished as a direct result of expanded state support for education in the first quarter of the 20th century. It also represents a key component of the paternalistic social and economic system that characterized textile mill villages in piedmont South Carolina from 1900-1945. From its construction in 1925, Warrenville school was in continuous use until 1992 as an educational institution for mill village children. The school is a large, rectangular, two-story brick building located at the west end of the Warrenville mill village. In 1954, two one-story wings were added to the rear (south) and west sides of the building, creating its present C-shaped plan. The school’s original brick and stone fašade features baroque massing and is encircled by a full entablature and projecting cornice with a parapet above the roofline. The main fašade is defined by slightly projecting central and end pavilions. The entablature here contains a frieze of four stone rondelles under a pediment featuring a bullseye window with cut keystones. The school is one of seven schools in Aiken County designed by W.W. Simmons & Son, an obscure architecture firm working out of Augusta, Georgia during the 1920s and active until 1951. Listed in the National Register May 22, 2002.

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