South Carolina Department of Archives and History
National Register Properties in South Carolina

Lookaway Hall, Aiken County (103 Forest Ave., North Augusta)
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Facade Left Elevation Left Rear Oblique Right Elevation Main Entrance
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Main Entrance
Panel Door
and Surround
Door Surround
and Transom

(Jackson-Mealing House) Lookaway Hall was built from 1895 to 1898 for Walter M. Jackson who, with his brother James U. Jackson, formed the North Augusta Land Company in 1890 in order to “develop those beautiful hills across the river” from Augusta. The home is an imposing high style example of the Beaux-Arts style, being built just two years after the Columbian Exposition of 1893 which made the Beaux Arts and Revival styles popular in America. The home, at the focal point of the new community, was most likely a symbol of the “good life” that North Augusta could provide. It is still a symbol of North Augusta, used on the city seal and considered a landmark by the citizens. Lookaway Hall is a two-story, wood frame house covered with white painted weatherboard siding. It is set on solid brick piers with lattice-pattern brick infill. A crucial element is the monumental two-story portico with Ionic columns and a full entablature, including a frieze festooned with garlands. Its plan is a modified T-shape with octagonal bays at the protruding sides. A single-story and two-story additions have modified its appearance at the rear of the building, but the original roof lines and detailing are still visible. The hip roof is covered with asphalt shingles. The siting of Lookaway Hall, on a hill in a fork in the road overlooking the town of North Augusta, adds to its imposing appearance. Listed in the National Register August 13, 1992.

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